The Netflix docu-series “Rotten” leaves you decide…

“Rotten” is an insightful Netflix docu-series about the underworld dealings in the global trade of food produced by Zero Point Zero.  . It explores the supply chain of various food products from honey, to fish, chicken, avocado, garlic and much more. It reveals unsavoury truths about food fraud, exploitation of cheap labour, the involvement of corrupt politicians in business, amongst others.

They say put your best foot forward and “Lawyers, Guns and Honey” is a worthy start the Netflix docu-series, “Rotten.” Nigerians face a huge counterfeiting problem because of a huge influx of substandard goods, most of which is blamed on poor regulation. But what happens when China beats the a highly regulated system as alleged in Rotten? “The Peanut Problem,” “Big Bird” and “Cod is Dead,” are also very gripping and thought-provoking.

Two seasons of “Rotten” comprising six episodes each are currently streaming on Netflix. After watching them you will wonder what is organic or healthy? What is sustainably sourced? Or is sustainability a gimmick created by those seeking to control the market? For what it is worth, you will get an incline as to why some rural workers in the U.S support President Donald Trump. Most importantly, you get a true sense of what people mean when they say being successful is not about ‘working hard but working smart.’

Episodes of “Rotten” run from 48 to 63 minutes and feature several criminal cases brought against members of the supply chain including, manufacturers, distributors, and others involved in the process. Documentaries or Netflix docu-series like “Rotten” present research findings. And like every research, “Rotten” leaves you to decide what you do with the information. To believe or not to believe? To make adjustment to your choices or not? To stick to what you have always known? Or perhaps to research further.

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About the author

A lover of the arts who sees film and television through the eyes of the Nigerian viewer.